American Policing is a Problem for Everyone, but That’s Not the Media’s Narrative Push

We won’t hear about this from the media because there’s no divisive racial angle to push when a white person is shot by police in their home, without warning.

Know Your Parasites Police Politicians

Aurora police didn’t identify themselves before shooting man at his home, attorney says

By: Ryan Osborne , Gary Brode
Oct 16, 2019

The attorney for the man who was shot by Aurora police at his home last week said officers did not identify themselves before shooting the man through his window.

Police, in a probable cause affidavit and a statement Wednesday, said officers waved at Andrew Huff from outside of the home and were “certain” he recognized them as police, and said that one officer knocked on Huff’s door before the shooting.

But neither the affidavit nor the statement mentioned that officers verbally identified themselves to Huff.

“They had an opportunity to identify themselves when he was walking up to his house,” said Huff’s attorney, Birk Baumgartner. “They didn’t do that.”

Leah Freeman, Huff’s partner, said all the family saw “were people in black with guns outside of our house, in our lawn and we don’t know who they are.”

Read More: https://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/local-news/aurora-police-didnt-identify-themselves-before-shooting-man-at-his-home-attorney-says

This is a 3rd incident that happened during the same time as the Forth Worth incident and Guyer verdict.

This person was white so it wasn’t reported in the mainstream media, because the mainstream media is a divisive outrage machine for profit and clicks.
 
The problem of out-of-control police violence is lack of accountability, training, and shift from ‘serve and protect’ to ‘law enforcement, not racism, since officers of color are more likely to kill people of color….

BLACK COPS ARE JUST AS LIKELY AS WHITE COPS TO KILL BLACK SUSPECTS

 

white police officers actually kill black and other minority suspects at lower rates than we would expect if killings were randomly distributed among officers of all races.”
In contrast, “we find that nonwhite officers kill both black and Latino suspects at significantly higher rates than white officers,” they write.”

Do White Law Enforcement Officers Target Minority Suspects?

This study began with the observation that many perceive, as a result of recent shootings of young African American males, that white law enforcement officers are more likely to exercise lethal force when the suspect is a young black man, even when suspect is unarmed. This perspective has been fueled by the tendency of media to fixate on such cases, even though our data indicate that these cases are highly unusual. It is perhaps unsurprising, though, that these egregious cases of lethal police misconduct receive massive media attention: the controversial, the unpopular, the unusual, and the bizarre are all well‐known indicators of “newsworthiness” (e.g., McCombs 2014; Straubhaar, LaRose, and Davenport 2009; Strother 2017).

One unfortunate feature of the media focus on atypical cases is the persistence of the “bad apple” theory of police misconduct: disproportionate killing of young African American men, the theory goes, is driven by racist white cops—the bad apples. However, much research in organizational theory suggests that the problem of disproportionate killing may be fundamentally institutional. …

This study began with the observation that many perceive, as a result of recent shootings of young African American males, that white law enforcement officers are more likely to exercise lethal force when the suspect is a young black man, even when suspect is unarmed. This perspective has been fueled by the tendency of media to fixate on such cases, even though our data indicate that these cases are highly unusual. It is perhaps unsurprising, though, that these egregious cases of lethal police misconduct receive massive media attention: the controversial, the unpopular, the unusual, and the bizarre are all well‐known indicators of “newsworthiness” (e.g., McCombs 2014; Straubhaar, LaRose, and Davenport 2009; Strother 2017).

One unfortunate feature of the media focus on atypical cases is the persistence of the “bad apple” theory of police misconduct: disproportionate killing of young African American men, the theory goes, is driven by racist white cops—the bad apples. However, much research in organizational theory suggests that the problem of disproportionate killing may be fundamentally institutional.

To be very clear, we are not arguing that the disproportionate killing of black suspects is racially innocuous. Indeed, law enforcement officers of all races disproportionately kill black suspects. The killing of black suspects is a police problem, not a white police problem.