Capitalism—A New Idea

Capitalism—A New Idea by Jeff Thomas – International Man

Capitalism, whether praised or derided, is an economic system and ideology based on private ownership of the means of production and operation for profit.

Classical economics recognises capitalism as the most effective means by which an economy can thrive. Certainly, in 1776, Adam Smith made one of the best cases for capitalism in his book, An Inquiry Into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations(known more commonly as The Wealth of Nations). But the term “capitalism” actually was first used to deride the ideology, by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, in The Communist Manifesto, in 1848.

Of course, whether Mister Marx was correct in his criticisms or not, he lived in an age when capitalism and a free market were essentially one and the same. Today, this is not the case. The capitalist system has been under attack for roughly 100 years, particularly in North America and the EU.

A tenet of capitalism is that, if it’s left alone, it will sort itself out and will serve virtually everyone well. Conversely, every effort to make the free market less free diminishes the very existence of capitalism, making it less able to function.

Today, we’re continually reminded that we live under a capitalist system and that it hasn’t worked. The middle class is disappearing, and the cost of goods has become too high to be affordable. There are far more losers than winners, and the greed of big business is destroying the economy.

This is what we repeatedly hear from left-leaning people and, in fact, they are correct. They then go on to label these troubles as byproducts of capitalism and use this assumption to argue that capitalism should give way to socialism.

In this, however, they are decidedly wrong. These are the byproducts of an increasing level of collectivism and fascism in the economy. In actual fact, few, if any, of these people have ever lived in a capitalist (free-market) society, as it has been legislated out of existence in the former “free” world over the last century.

So, let’s have a look at those primary sore spots that are raised by suggesting that collectivism will correct the “evils” of capitalism.

Read More: thedailycoin.org/2017/08/28/capitalism-new-idea/

Communism, Where Dreams Go to Die: A Personal Experience in the Socialist Republic of Romania – Liberty Hangout

 

There are a lot of journalists, media pundits, and intellectuals in the West that think that communism is the only choice and that communism greatly improved our lives. Much of these opinions are due to total ignorance and lack of knowledge regarding communist regimes and life in a communist country.  I’m not trying to convince them of otherwise. I’m merely showing them and everyone interested in communism the reality of life in a communist dictatorship.

My Childhood

I was born 35 years go in Romania, a country in the Balkans, a country though full of resources, corrupted and oppressed by its own ruling class. Those who were in power in my country were not aristocrats, did not inherit any titles. Some of them were part of the communist party (agitators, criminals, terrorists) before the war, others climbed the social ladder by being informants and reporting on others.

It is obvious since I was quite small at the time of the Revolution (the revolution through which Romania ousted its dictator) I did not know much of the politics. I of course, remember Marx’s, Lenin’s and Ceausescu’s (our dictator) portraits on the walls of my kindergarten and later my school.

One of the earliest memories I had at kindergarten is when, one day I went to the kindergarten dressed a little bit different from my colleagues. My uncle had sent some clothes from USA (where he defected), normal clothing, trousers and shirt. Osh Kosh Bigosh was the brand of the clothing as I remember. That day I was punished for a few hours, locked in a room and sent home. My teacher was scandalized that I was not dressed in my uniform, blue trousers, red shirt and red tie. In kindergarten kids were organized into a sort of boy scouts, named “Motherland’s Hawks”. We all had to wear that specific uniform in the colors of our flag. I didn’t understand the outrage my teacher had shown towards my mother’s choice of clothing regarding me but I told my parents and from that day I never dared to put on those “imperialist, capitalist, fascist american clothing”

Another memory from kindergarten years was when, one daym I invented a silly nursery rhyme with our dictators name in it. I remember my father’s face as it went pale and him telling me to never say that thing again as he feared the Militia. Any kind of negative speech against our dearest leader was of course banned.

These were just a few of my memories that I remember, very clearly.

Survival and food

My father was a dentist working in conditions, of which no western doctor could ever work and survive in. My mother was working at a light bulb factory, in better conditions but all under the vigilant eyes of Communist Party informants. To have a better image of what went on in an office, imagine now you could not even crack a joke about your president. Those who told jokes, or cursed the dictator were interrogated, demoted and eventually arrested.

As food was scarce because of rationing, my father often went at night to buy food from the black market. Yes try to imagine going into a supermarket and finding no food, except maybe,maybe, a few canned sardines, expired and long overdue. Yes getting food was like getting drugs nowadays.

I remember one night as my father came home with oranges (which where impossible to find at any supermarket) and some meat, but scared to death. The local dealer, he said, had been murdered.

Getting food for your family of course was a risk that you had to assume, as you had no other choices.

As I said before food was scarce, but not because we didn’t have any, we had plenty of resources. Our dictator choose to lend Saddam Hussein and others, such as Muammar Qaddafi with large sums of money and he also started repaying every debt we had to the west or to USSR. The latter in itself was not a bad idea. The bad idea that led to our starvation and eventually to his demise, was the fact that he started rationing the food, thus creating the infamous “bread line” or “bread queues”.

Bread queues were also a risk that you had to assume. As I already said, getting food was a risky business in the Socialist Republic of Romania, and as a matter of fact in any eastern european and soviet countries. Others, in countries as Cambodia, or Mao’s China were not as fortunate and died of starvation.

In order to get in line and buy food( meaning only one quarter of bread and a quarter of milk) ordinary people (as opposed to the ruling class) had to wake up at around 4:00 am and get in the line. If you woke up too late, there was no more food, those shops were closed and the supermarket such as the one above in the picture closed. And even if you woke up early and got in the line, sometimes the supermarket would ran out of food.

You could easily bribe someone in charge of that “supermarket” (of course owned by the state). A pack of Kent cigarettes or good coffee from Germany would go a long way. A bottle of Ballantines  Johnie Walker would get you a passport, and a pack of Kent cigarettes would get even get you some meat. But that happened only if you had relatives in the West, as there was no way you could buy Western cigarettes, coffee or whiskey in any supermarket from any corner in Romania. Money of course had no value, as you could not buy much with it. For a car you had to wait years, and for an apartment in of these buildings.

Read More: libertyhangout.org/2017/08/communism-dreams-go-die-personal-experience-balkans/

The Globalist Long Game – Redefine Liberty Activism As Evil “Populism”

4 legs good, 2 legs bad

One of the most favored propaganda tactics of establishment elites and the useful idiots they employ in Marxist and cultural-Marxist circles is to relabel or redefine an opponent before they can solidly define themselves.  In other words, elites and Marxists will seek to “brand” you (just as corporations use branding) in the minds of the masses so that they can take away your ability to define yourself as anything else.

Think of it this way: Say you want to launch an organization called “Movement Blue,” and you and others have gone through great struggle to grow this organization from the ground up.  However, just as your movement is about to achieve widespread recognition, someone else comes along, someone with extensive capital and media influence, and they saturate every outlet with the narrative that your movement is actually more like “Movement Red,” and that Movement Red is a terrible, no-good, bad idea.  They do such a good job, in fact, that millions and millions of people start calling you “Movement Red” without even knowing why, and they begin to believe all the negative associations that this label entails.

Through the art of negative branding, your enemy has stolen your most precious asset — the ability to present yourself to the public as you really are.

Negative branding is a form of psychological inoculation.  It is designed to close people’s minds to particular ideas before they actually hear those ideas presented by a true proponent of the ideas.  But beyond that, negative branding can also be used to trick groups and movements into abandoning their original identity.

For example, the concept of economic freedom for individuals –the freedom from overt government interference or government favoritism for certain people over others, the freedom to compete with ideas and ingenuity to build a better business and a better product, the freedom to retain the fruits of one’s labor — used to be widely referred to as “free markets”, as defined by Adam Smith.  The very basis of free market philosophy was to remove obstruction and economic oppression from the common man in order to inspire a renaissance in innovation and prosperity.  The problem is, you rarely hear anyone but libertarians talk about traditional “free markets” anymore.

Though Karl Marx did not coin the term “capitalism,” he and his followers (and editors) are indeed guilty of the pejorative version now used.  It has always been Marxist propagandists who have sought to redefine the idea of “free markets” in a negative way, and the use of the term capitalism is how they did it.  They have been so effective in their efforts that today even some free market proponents instead refer to themselves as “capitalists.”

While “free markets” denote freedom of the common man to pursue a better life through productivity and intelligence and merit, “capitalism” denotes a monstrous and blind pursuit of wealth and power without moral regard.  One gives the impression of fairness, the other gives the impression of tyranny.

Read More: www.alt-market.com/articles/3129-the-globalists-long-game-redefine-liberty-activism-as-evil-qpopulismq