FAKING the NEWS: The CIA’s Use of the American News Media

The corporate media has been lying for decades under the direction of the CIA

Anderson Cooper

After leaving The Washington Post in 1977, Carl Bernstein spent six months looking at the relationship of the CIA and the press during the Cold War years. His 25,000-word cover story, published in Rolling Stone on October 20, 1977, is [linked] below.

THE CIA AND THE MEDIA

How Americas Most Powerful News Media Worked Hand in Glove with the Central Intelligence Agency and Why the Church Committee Covered It Up

BY CARL BERNSTEIN

In 1953, Joseph Alsop, then one of America’s leading syndicated columnists, went to the Philippines to cover an election. He did not go because he was asked to do so by his syndicate. He did not go because he was asked to do so by the newspapers that printed his column. He went at the request of the CIA.

Alsop is one of more than 400 American journalists who in the past twenty‑five years have secretly carried out assignments for the Central Intelligence Agency, according to documents on file at CIA headquarters. Some of these journalists’ relationships with the Agency were tacit; some were explicit. There was cooperation, accommodation and overlap. Journalists provided a full range of clandestine services—from simple intelligence gathering to serving as go‑betweens with spies in Communist countries. Reporters shared their notebooks with the CIA. Editors shared their staffs. Some of the journalists were Pulitzer Prize winners, distinguished reporters who considered themselves ambassadors without‑portfolio for their country. Most were less exalted: foreign correspondents who found that their association with the Agency helped their work; stringers and freelancers who were as interested in the derring‑do of the spy business as in filing articles; and, the smallest category, full‑time CIA employees masquerading as journalists abroad. In many instances, CIA documents show, journalists were engaged to perform tasks for the CIA with the consent of the managements of America’s leading news organizations.

The history of the CIA’s involvement with the American press continues to be shrouded by an official policy of obfuscation and deception for the following principal reasons:

■ The use of journalists has been among the most productive means of intelligence‑gathering employed by the CIA. Although the Agency has cut back sharply on the use of reporters since 1973 primarily as a result of pressure from the media), some journalist‑operatives are still posted abroad.

■ Further investigation into the matter, CIA officials say, would inevitably reveal a series of embarrassing relationships in the 1950s and 1960s with some of the most powerful organizations and individuals in American journalism.

Read More: http://www.carlbernstein.com/magazine_cia_and_media.php

Recently Declassified: The CIA Has Controlled The Media For Years!

Written by Michael Best  Edited by JPat Brown
February 15, 2017

A version of this article appeared on Glomar Disclosure

Memo offers a look into the CIA’s private press pool

Agency cultivated a network of journalists to help “fight misinformation” and “restore faith in the institution”

While most people with an interest in the history of CIA will have heard of “Operation Mockingbird,” which weaponized the press for propaganda purposes through the “Office of Policy Coordination,” there is another side to program that’s much less well-known. A declassified memo from 1965 reveals a network of journalists that regularly received intelligence from Ray S. Cline, one of CIA’s senior analysts and at that time the Deputy Director of the Directorate of Intelligence. Several of these journalists were former intelligence officers and were not only involved in information and propaganda dissemination, but other ongoing CIA operations.

Joseph Alsop, for instance, agreed to report on the 1953 Philippine elections for the Agency as cover for gathering information for the Agency. According to Mr. Cline, he met with Alsop whenever the reporter requested it “to discuss international events of interest to him for the purpose of writing his columns, giving him guidance as to my thinking on these subjects whenever it was possible.” These meetings were also held at the request of the Director of Central Intelligence, who preferred for Alsop “to write reasonable columns [rather] than to have misinformation published.”

A 1965 report to the Director makes it clear that the information flowed in more than one direction. According to the report written by Mr. Cline, Joseph Alsop began to provide him with information about Viet Cong strength without asking for his view on it.

In addition to identifying a number of journalists involved in this CIA network and providing some basic information about their activities, the memo praises the leaks and the use of the press to manipulate the public’s perception of the Agency in the context of “impaired public confidence.”

As part of giving the journalists information that would help further the Agency’s goals and improve public perception of it, Ray Cline gave extensive briefings based on briefings given to the National Security Council by the Director of Central Intelligence. One such briefing was given to Stewart Alsop, the brother of Joseph Alsop and a former officer in the Agency’s World War II predecessor, the Office of Strategic Services. “at the Director’s instruction” and excluded military weapons data. The Director similarly instructed Mr. Cline to maintain similar briefings “without disclosing classified information” to Joseph Alsop.

The memo repeatedly states that all the information provided to the press was either unclassified and not sensitive, or “general analysis.” One such example of general analysis, given to Time Magazine correspondent Jess Cook, remains a secret.

While the information was given the press for publication, even a brief description of that information and analysis is redacted because it would “reveal the identity of a confidential human source, a human intelligence source, a relationship with an intelligence or security service of a foreign government or international organization, or a non-human intelligence source; or impair the effectiveness of an intelligence method currently in use, available for use, or under development.” Unfortunately, this is a classic example of the Agency improperly attempting to use a broad exemption to withhold information – Mr. Cline explained that he provided the information so that Jess Cook and TIME would give “a reasonable treatment of [the subject].” The information was explicitly intended for publication, meaning it was already revealed to the public.

The journalists identified in the memo as having been a part of Ray Cline’s network are:

Read More: www.muckrock.com/news/archives/2017/feb/15/memo-offers-look-cias-private-press-pool/