How Congress Can Restore Local and Parental Control Over Education

Big Brother Own Your Children

In preparing to shut down the federal government in November 1995, before President Clinton’s veto of the second continuing resolution to keep federal agencies operating, the Clinton Administration made the customary distinction between “essential” employees, who would remain on the job, and “non-essential” employees, who would be furloughed. For the U.S. Department of Education, the Clinton Administration determined that 4,394 of the department’s 4,937 employees — or 89 percent — were “non-essential” and would be furloughed for the duration of the budget impasse.1

Unwittingly, the Clinton Administration confirmed what Congress should recognize: America does not need a federal Department of Education. Congress should take the opportunity afforded by the budget process to return to states, local governments, and parents the authority and responsibility for education.

Read More: www.heritage.org/education/report/how-congress-can-restore-local-and-parental-control-over-education